Peperomia

Peperomia (radiator plant) is one of the two large genera of the family Piperaceae.
Most of them are compact, small perennial epiphytes.

Peperomia is a bushy upright plant that is a popular houseplant. It typically grows on thick erect stems to 1 foot tall. Waxy, elliptic-obovate thick dark green leaves are 1-6 inches long. Small greenish-white flowers are borne on spikes up to 5 inches long. Many variegated cultivars with leaves that are mottled with cream, gray or gold, have been developed. Peperomia is native to southern Florida and the Caribbean.

These plants are usually propagated by seeds. They are also commercially propagated by cuttings. Peperomia cuttings root easily. Propagation by cuttings is the quickest and easiest method to propagate.

Plants can be divided at potting time. They are removed and separated into smaller pieces, each with a few roots attached. Leaf or stem cuttings can also be taken in the spring or summer. The lower leaves of the shoots are removed and a cut is made below the bottom node (joint). They are then laid on a bench for an hour or two to allow a protective callus tissue to form over the cuts. They are then inserted in a propagating case with bottom heat of 70โ€“75 degrees F.

It is best not to seal the top completely, as the plants are semi-succulent in nature and excessive humidity is detrimental. When enough roots have formed, cuttings can be planted in 3-inch pots or in hanging baskets. (Source: Wikipedia)

That’s all about peperomia. If you like the blogpost don’t forget to check out my EBOOKS ON INDOOR PLANTS AND FLOWERING PLANTS. CLICK HERE.

Published by Reema

Blogger | Gardner | Entrepreneur

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