Clematis

clematis flowers

Clematis is a genus of about 300 species within the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. In this post, we will be discussing about Clematis flammula (or that is what I think is the closest to the species I am going to describe. Kindly correct me if I am wrong. However the incorrect identification of species won’t affect the content of this post as all the care, maintenance and other suggestions are based on personal experiences and I know they work well. 😀 ). So let’s dive into it!

It is cultivated worldwide as an ornamental plant in gardens. The woody vine bears fragrant white flowers and small green achenes. When the flowers are newly opened they have a strong sweet almond fragrance. (I just wrote almond fragrance and I have written vanilla scent in the above image. How do we decide on the name of fragrance? Anyways, you can buy this plant, smell the sweet scent and then call it whatever you like) The vine grows in a tangled mass that is heavily sprinkled with flowers throughout the warmer months. It is popular with gardeners as a decoration along fences and trellises, or as ground cover. If the vine has no other plants or structures to climb on, it will climb on itself, forming a large, densely tangled bush. The plant sends out many shoots and can reach over five meters in height.

Let’s talk about care and maintenance. But before we do that, here are a few common names of clematis.

This plant is very easy to care for and requires very little time and effort. Once you have trained the vine to grow thee way you want, rest everything is pretty simple. I have trained my jasmine vines, but not this one. I have let them grow straight up vertically with the support of a wooden stick. Remember, as i have mentioned earlier, if the vine has no other plants or structures to climb on, it will climb on itself, forming a large, densely tangled bush.

Here’s how I would like to sum up this post!

Published by Reema

Blogger | Gardner | Entrepreneur

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